Why do I always want to masturbate?

Excessive sexual drive and masturbation can disturb your life. Learn more about hypersexuality and why people compulsively masturbate here.

3
minute read

If you are reading this, you are probably feeling upset with yourself for needing to masturbate often. But there are reasons and causes for this type of compulsive behavior. And it might help you to know that you are not alone. An estimated 2-6% of people experience impulsive-compulsive sexual behavior, and one in one hundered men masturbate more than once per day. But if you are part of this population, how normal is self-pleasure? What causes it? And can hypersexuality be treated?

Is frequent masturbation normal?

Frequent masturbation (also known as auto eroticism) is a type of hyper sexual activity that can interrupt your life and affect your social, physical and mental well being. Officially, psychiatrists can diagnose men or women who masturbate excessively as a Sexual Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (Sexual Disorder NOS). More on normal ranges of masturbation frequency here.  But before mental health specialists enter the picture, some other medical conditions exist which can be causing you to want to always masturbate.

What causes me to want to masturbate regularly?

Firstly, too much masturbation can be caused by medical conditions. Physical or mental disorders (or side effects of medications used to treat them) can bring on states of hypersexuality which cause excessive masturbation. Some examples of the medical reasons which can be the reason people masturbate frequently include:

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • bipolar disorder
  • brain injury
  • impulse control disorder
  • Klein-Levin syndrome
  • Kluver-Bucy syndrome
  • medication side effects (drugs for Parkinson’s disease)
  • use of methamphetamine

Or, people who masturbate excessively may simply do so because hypersexuality is the problem itself.

Regular masturbation can be a type of sexual addiction

Mental health experts still do not agree on what causes hypersexual behaviors such as compulsive masturbation. And they have not yet agreed on how to diagnose addictive sexual disorders. Out-of-control sexual thoughts and acting out, however, can indicate a type of impulsive or compulsive sex problem, which can be treated by mental health specialists. Some specific signs and symptoms of compulsive masturbation include:

  • Excessive masturbation affects work, social, interpersonal, and intimate relationships or responsibilities
  • Feeling loneliness after an orgasm
  • Lack of sexual satisfaction after auto eroticism
  • Masturbating 5–15 times a day
  • Obsessive and compulsive drive toward sexual self-stimulation of the genitalia
  • Physical injury when masturbating
  • Stopping masturbation only after exhaustion, injury, or extreme social pressure

Keep in mind here that the essential feature of sexual addiction is the use of sexual activity (including oneself) to escape intimacy. And if sexual compulsion to masturbate is not driven by this fear, sexual addiction may not be the problem. Top 10 sex addiction signs here.  Nonetheless, if you are experiencing any of the above signs, there is help. And you ARE NOT crazy, or immoral, or dirty. You just need help.

In sum, repetitive masturbation is a symptom of hypersexuality that requires your attention. Too much autoeroticism can be labeled as compulsive, addictive, or impulsive. Regardless of the classification used, this disorder represents a severe burden if you experience it. If you masturbate too frequently, it can cause you emotional, mental and physical stress. You can find help for sex related issues at The Society for the Advancement of Sexual Health or the International Institute for Trauma and Addiction Professionals. Or post your questions below. We are here to help.

Reference sources: Impulsive – Compulsive Sexual Behavior by Mick & Hollander
Wiki on Hypersexuality
About the author
Lee Weber is a published author, medical writer, and woman in long-term recovery from addiction. Her latest book, The Definitive Guide to Addiction Interventions is set to reach university bookstores in early 2019.
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